Avner de-Shalit

Professor of Political Science

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

אבנר דה-שליט, אבנר דה שליט, avner de-shalit,  avner de shalit, civicism, human rights, democracy, environmental politics, equality,  socialism, urban politics, political science, political philosophy, political theory, 

Authored books     -     Edited books     -     Hebrew

 

Communitarianism and Individualism

Edited with Shlomo Avineri, Published in 1992 by Oxford University Press.

Along the 1980's, a lot of political and moral thought has been devoted to the debate between communitarianism and individualism. While individualists advocate the notions of rights, neutrality, and impartiality, and see society as a voluntary association for mutual advantage, communitarians argue that individuals are never detached from their society, culture, and history and that if they are to be properly understood they must first be examined in these contexts. Moreover communitarians claim that individualism makes it impossible to achieve a genuine community which can offer its members a just distribution of goods and morally meaningful life.

The essays collected in this volume reflect the many facets of this debate and examine its implications for the political arena. They cover a wide spectrum of thought and opinion and include work by Ronald Dworkin, Marilyn Friedman, David Gauthier, Amy Gutmann, Will Kymlicka, Alasdair MacIntyre, David Miller, Robert Nozick, John Rawls, Michael Sandel, Charles Taylor, and Michael Walzer.

Liberalism and its Practice

Edited with Dan Avnon, published in 1999 by Routledge.

 

From the book's cover: Liberalism and its Practice brings together leading authorities who provide an excellent insight into the meaning and practice of liberalism. This book explores current debates surrounding liberalism at the end of the twentieth century and what it has to offer in practice. Its focus is two of liberalism's greatest emerging challenges: multiculturalism and states struggling with the transition to democracy. It considers considers the significant tensions that these pressures bring to liberal frameworks and asks what the viable alternatives are.

What role can philosophers play in helping to resolve the moral and political dilemmas faced by environmental activists and policymakers? Moving away from environmental philosophy's usual focus on abstractions such as nonanthropocentrism and the intrinsic value of nature, this book focuses on environmental practice as the starting point for theoretical reflection. Philosophical thinking, it argues, need not be divided into the academic and the practical. Philosophy can take a more publicly engaged approach.

Moral and Political Reasoning in Environmental Practice

Edited with Andrew Light,Published in 2003 by MIT University Press.

 

 

 

Forms of Justice: Critical Perspectives on David Miller's Political Philosophy

Edited with Daniel Bell, published in 2003 by Rowman & Littlefield.

 

 

 

From the book's cover: What is justice? Great political philosophers from Plato to Rawls have traditionally argued that there is a single, principled answer to this question. Challenging this conventional wisdom, David Miller theorized that justice can take many different forms. In Forms of Justice, a distinguished group of political philosophers takes Miller's theory as a starting point and debates whether justice takes one form or many. Drawing real world implications from theories of justice and examining in depth social justice, national justice, and global justice, this book falls on the cutting edge of the latest developments in political theory. Sure to generate debate among political theorists and social scientists, Forms of Justice is indispensable reading for anyone attentive to the intersection between philosophy and politics.